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2017 ITEROS-WEEK8-DAY4

WEEK 8

Cooperating with Christ in His Heavenly Ministry by Running with Endurance the Race Set before Us, Looking Away unto Jesus, the Author and Perfecter of Our Faith

‹‹ DAY 4 ››

OUTLINE

C. Faith is a substantiating ability, a sixth sense, the sense by which we substantiate, give substance to, the things unseen or hoped for (Heb. 11:1):

1. Substantiating is the ability that enables us to realize a substance.

2. The function of our five senses is to substantiate the things of the outside world, transferring all the objective items into us to become our subjective experience.

3. As the eye is to seeing, the ear to hearing, and the nose to smelling, so faith, our spirit of faith, is the organ whereby we substantiate everything in the unseen spiritual world into us (2 Cor. 4:13):

a. We must exercise our spirit of faith, our mingled spirit, to believe and to speak the things we have experienced of the Lord.

b.Faith is in our spirit, which is mingled with the Holy Spirit, not in our mind; doubts are in our mind.

4. We do not regard, look at, the things which are seen but the things which are not seen; for the things which are seen are temporary, but the things which are not seen are eternal (v. 18):

a. The Christian life is a life of things unseen (Rom. 8:24-25; Heb. 11:27; 1 Pet. 1:8; Gal. 6:10).

b.The degradation of the church is the degradation from unseen things to seen things.

c.  The Lord’s recovery is to recover His church from things seen to things unseen.

5. Faith assures us of the things not seen, convincing us of what we do not see; therefore, it is the evidence, the proof, of things unseen.

‹‹ WEEK 8 —DAY 4 ››

Morning Nourishment

Heb. 11:1 Now faith is the substantiation of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.

2 Cor. 4:13 And having the same spirit of faith according to that which is written, “I believed, therefore I spoke”...

18 Because we do not regard the things which are seen but the things which are not seen; for the things which are seen are temporary, but the things which are not seen are eternal.

After presenting in the first ten chapters a thorough comparison of Judaism and God’s economy, this book charges the Hebrew believers, who were in danger of shrinking back, to live, to walk, to go   on, by faith (10:38-39), that is, not by appearance (2 Cor. 5:7). Then, in Hebrews 11 it goes on to define faith according to the history of faith. Both the eternal inheritance (9:15) and the great reward (10:35) promised by God are things hoped for and things not seen. Faith is the substantiation of things hoped for. Hence, it is the assurance, the confidence, the confirmation, the reality, the essence, the supporting ground, of things hoped for, the foundation that supports the things hoped for. Faith is also the conviction of things not seen. It convinces us of what we do not see. Hence, it is the evidence, the proof, of things not seen. (Heb. 11:1, footnote 1)

Today’s Reading

The same Greek word [for substantiation in Hebrews 11:1] is used for substance in 1:3, assurance in 3:14, and confidence (in which one knows that he has a sure foundation) in 2 Corinthians 11:17. Moreover, it can be translated confirmation, reality, essence (which denotes the real nature of things, as opposed to the appearance), foundation, or supporting ground. The word means, primarily, substance, but in Hebrews 11:1 it denotes the substantiating of the substance (of the things hoped for); hence, it   is translated substantiation. The word substantiate is substance in verb form; to substantiate is to give substance to the reality of the substance not seen. This is the action of faith. Therefore, it says here that faith is the substantiation of things hoped for. (Heb. 11:1, footnote 2)

[In 2 Corinthians 4:13] the spirit of faith is the Holy Spirit mingled with our human spirit. We must exercise such a spirit to believe and to speak, like the psalmist, the things we have experienced of the Lord, especially His death and resurrection. Faith is in our spirit, which is mingled with the Holy Spirit, not in our mind. Doubts are in our mind. Here spirit indicates that it is by the mingled spirit that the apostles lived a crucified life in resurrection for the carrying out of their ministry. (2 Cor. 4:13, footnote 2)

[Faith] is a divine ability which has been infused into us....Whenever we contact God or listen to His word, the substantiating ability which has been infused into our being by God Himself spontaneously begins to realize the things of God, the things hoped for, and the things not seen, and we simply believe....Faith is a special sense in addition to the five senses derived from our natural birth. This sense substantiates the things of God, things which we do not see. (Life-study of Hebrews, p. 535)

We acquired this substantiating sense through the preaching of the gospel. Proper gospel preaching is not merely a matter of teaching; it must also be a matter of transfusion. In order to preach the gospel to sinners, we must first receive something of and from the Lord. Then, as we are preaching, what we have received of the Lord will enter, like electricity, into those who are listening. While we are speaking and the people are looking at and listening to us, something spontaneously and unconsciously will be transfused into them. Although they may shake their heads, not consenting to our preaching, deep within they will believe what we are saying. Although some may say to themselves that it is silly to believe, something within them will continue to react and bring them to the point where they say, “Lord Jesus, thank You. You are so good. Lord, You are my Savior.” Because some element has been transfused into their being, they will be able to believe in the Lord. This is the result of the transfusion of faith by God through a preacher. (The Conclusion of the New Testament, pp. 3827, 3829)

 

Further Reading: The Conclusion of the New Testament, msg. 380